Day in the Life of Maggie

 

In the old days, photography meant going to a studio all dressed in your finest. The photographer would pose you in front of a backdrop, sometimes with props. My husband, in a previous life, had a Corgi name Kimo and a Golden Retriever named Kona. His wife (ex, not me) took these fine young dogs to get their portraits taken. When I met my husband, he proudly displayed the photographs on his desk. One that we will never stop laughing about is Kimo in a bucket. Yep the Corgi somehow ended up in a bucket, smiling away, and that was the photo that will go down in history. If I still had a copy I would share with you now. I don’t, but I think you can imagine it.

Fast forward to now, and you’ll hear the terms ‘lifestyle’ or ‘documentary’ or even ‘photojournalistic’ approaches. They all mean a little something different, but one type of session that has really become popular is Day In the Life. This means that the photographer basically follows your family around for an entire day. She might even sleep at your house the night before, so she can get the waking up and having breakfast shots. I’ll admit, I love the idea, the approach, the treasured keepsake-ness of it all.

One of many naps…

One of many naps…

So real life photography is something that speaks to my heart. It’s about how we REALLY looked and lived, and not just what we looked like for a particular picture. So in the spirit of this style of photography, I decided to do a day in the life of my sweet princess, Maggie. Well as you can imagine, there was a whole lot of napping going on. Some running around, sure. But mostly napping.

In order to amuse myself, and add some interest to my session, I pulled out my macro lens. Let me explain a bit. A macro lens is for taking super close-up photographs. A normal lens won’t focus if you are too close. It kind of freaks out in a “geez back off will you?” kind of way. But a macro lens? On yeah, get up in there, with that one. It’s typically used for flowers, sometimes insects. Not typically for dog toes or ears. But I think you know by now - I’m not exactly typical.

Dog toes…one of my favorite subjects (don’t judge)

Dog toes…one of my favorite subjects (don’t judge)

So if documentary pet photography and macro photography had a baby, then that would be this session. Creative juices flowing? You know it! And that is when the magic happens. So I got some action shots, some adorable feet pictures (I think I’ve mentioned my adoration of pet feet before - but definitely not in a creepy way), that pink nose…I mean come on! AND these pictures will be memories that years from now I will look at and say, “remember how she would hang off the back of the sofa looking around the neighborhood?” Or “remember how freaking adorable she was when she curled up for a nap?” Or “remember how sweet her little eyelashes were?” I think you get the picture…and then some.

That little underbite is just TOO much!

That little underbite is just TOO much!

And oh that pink nose…

And oh that pink nose…

I don’t have these types of photos of my previous pets. I just didn’t think about it then. But do I wish I had them now? Oh I sure do. I miss them, and the memories get so faded after a while. 

And the elusive action shot. All I had to do is wait for that little Chihuahua to walk by - she hates that guy.

And the elusive action shot. All I had to do is wait for that little Chihuahua to walk by - she hates that guy.

So however long we are lucky enough to be blessed by her presence, Maggie will continue to be my muse. She is spirited, adorable, and a perfect subject for my photographic experimentation. And hopefully my clients will reap the rewards of the new techniques I develop along the way. Yes, that does mean some macro shots of your dog’s nose, or underbite, or your cat’s toes. Just sit back and watch the process happen, it will all be worth it in the end. I promise!

 
Diane Evans4 Comments